radial play

Articles About radial play


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1 Radial Play (Internal Clearance in Ball Bearings) (August 2011)

At first glance, ball bearings are relatively simple mechanisms. However, an analysis of their internal geometries reveals that they are quite complex. For example, the ball to raceway conformity, the radial play, and the number of balls all impact the ability of a ball bearing to support loads under a variety of conditions.

2 Automatic for the People (April 2016)

The world is full-on automated. From our factories to our vehicles to our leisurely activities, the future is now and it’s nothing but algorithms, robotics and hands-free operation. It comes as no surprise that a 2016 Google search brings a fair amount of technology gone awry. The following examples don’t scare us (they’re actually quite fascinating) but they probably should worry us a little bit…

3 Understanding the Dynamic Influences of Gear Oils and Radial Shaft Seals (February 2018)

Sustainability is becoming one of the most important aspects within the power transmission business. Users demand low-maintenance drive systems with as little disruption as possible, and expect lifetimes of more than 10,000 hours. Approximately 40 percent of long-term gearbox leakages can be traced back to poor interaction between the radial shaft seal (RSS) and the lubricant. Thus, it becomes essential to analyze the tribological system as a whole, which includes the gear oil, seal grease (if required), elastomer material and design, and the shaft.

4 The Science of Radial Shaft Seals (April 2017)

SKF Product Investigation Center Troubleshoots Critical Rotating Equipment Applications with Analysis, Research and Testing Procedures.

5 Theoretical and Experimental Study of the Frictional Losses of Radial Shaft Seals for Industrial Gearbox (June 2015)

The improvement of the energy efficiency of industrial gear motors and gearboxes is a common problem for many gear unit manufacturers and end-users. As is typical of other mechanical components, the radial lip seals used in such units generate friction and heat, thus contributing to energy losses of mechanical systems. There exist today simulation tools that are already helping improve the efficiency of mechanical systems — but accurate models for seal frictional losses need to be developed. In this paper SKF presents an engineering model for radial lip seal friction based on a physical approach.