hydrodynamic lubrication

Articles About hydrodynamic lubrication


Articles are sorted by RELEVANCE. Sort by Date.

1 Minimum Design Speed Considerations for Sleevoil Bearings for Industrial Fan Applications (September 2016)

Slow speed operation of fan systems within the air handling industry is generally performed due to two reasons: a coast down operation is required for hot (induced draft) fans to cool down before shutdown (often by using a turning gear), and operational efficiency improvements can be achieved during non-peak periods by slow speed operation using a VFD. In either case, when these fans are supported by hydrodynamic bearings, it is the oil film thickness developed from the bearing-shaft interaction that limits the minimum speed that can be maintained without causing premature wear and bearing failure. This paper will present a brief overview of lubrication theory and critical design parameters to achieve slow speed operation.

2 The Meaning of Life (August 2016)

End users and OEMs frequently specify "lubed-for-life" mounted bearings, thinking the lubed-for-life bearings will deliver the same life — without lubrication — as bearings that currently require periodic lubrication. The truth is it depends on many factors, and only a detailed review of the application and testing will provide a more accurate answer.

3 FZG Gearboxes Lubricated with Different Formulations of Polyalphaolefin Wind Turbine Gear Oils (August 2016)

In order to analyze the different gear oils suitable for the lubrication of wind turbine gearboxes, five fully formulated ISO VG 320 gear oils were selected. In between the selected gear oils, four PAO base oils can be found: PAOR, PAOM, PAOC and PAOX. A mineral-based oil (MINR) was also included as reference.

4 The To-Do List (April 2016)

Lubrication management should be standard operating procedure at any manufacturing facility. Vital to both operational and maintenance personnel, a strong, coherent and specific lubrication program will have lasting results in machine efficiency and maintenance. Of course, even those with the best intentions can’t always keep up with the challenges presented day-to-day on the manufacturing floor. Thankfully, PTE is here to help with eight steps to selecting, storing, analyzing and managing your lubrication requirements.

5 Is Splash Lubrication Compatible with Efficient Gear Units for High-Speed Applications (October 2015)

A thermo-mechanical model of a splash lubricated one-stage gear unit is presented. This system corresponds to a first step towards the design of a hybrid vehicle gearbox that can operate up to 40,000 rpm on its primary shaft. The numerical model is based on the thermal network method and takes into account power losses due to teeth friction, rolling-elements bearings and oil churning. Some calculations underline that oil churning causes a high amount of power loss. A simple method to reduce this source of power losses is presented, and its influence on the gear unit efficiency and its thermal capacity is computed.

6 Recalibrated Equations for Determining Effect of Oil Filtration on Rolling Bearing Life (September 2015)

In 1991, Needelman and Zaretsky presented a set of empirically derived equations for bearing fatigue life (adjustment) factors (LFs) as a function of oil filter ratings.

7 An Open-And-Shut Case: Greases for Gear Applications (September 2016)

For the lubrication of open gear drives used in different industrial applications such as cement and coal mills, rotary furnaces, or where the sealing conditions are difficult, semi-fluid greases are often used in preference to fluid oils. For girth gear applications the greases are used with a splash or spray lubrication system. The selection of such greases influences pitting lifetime and the load-carrying capacity of the gears, as well as wear behavior

8 What Lubrication Method Should I Use (April 2016)

in the performance and life of a rolling element bearing. Less than 10 percent of bearings reach their theoretical L10 life, and poor lubrication can be attributed to 80 percent of those that fall short. Ideally, a lubricant forms a film layer between moving components in a bearing, separating moving parts, minimizing friction and preventing wear between balls or rollers, raceways and retainers. Lubricants also protect metal surfaces from corrosion and moisture, dissipate heat and can even prevent the ingress of contaminants.

9 A Model for Rolling Bearing Life with Surface and Subsurface Survival - Tribological Effects (September 2016)

Until now the estimation of rolling bearing life has been based on engineering models that consider an equivalent stress, originated beneath the contact surface, that is applied to the stressed volume of the rolling contact. Through the years, fatigue surface–originated failures, resulting from reduced lubrication or contamination, have been incorporated into the estimation of the bearing life by applying a penalty to the overall equivalent stress of the rolling contact. Due to this simplification, the accounting of some specific failure modes originated directly at the surface of the rolling contact can be challenging. In the present article, this issue is addressed by developing a general approach for rolling contact life in which the surfaceoriginated damage is explicitly formulated into the basic fatigue equations of the rolling contact. This is achieved by introducing a function to describe surface-originated failures and coupling it with the traditional, subsurface-originated fatigue risk of the rolling contact. The article presents the fundamental theory of the new model and its general behavior. The ability of the present general method to provide an account for the surface–subsurface competing fatigue mechanisms taking place in rolling bearings is discussed with reference to endurance testing data.

10 A Model for Shear Degradation of Lithium Soap Grease at Ambient Temperature (October 2017)

In this study the mechanical shear degradation of lithium-thickened grease was evaluated using an in-house-developed aging rig and a commercial rheometer. It was found that this grease loses its original consistency during aging and shows a two-phase aging behavior. In the first phase, primarily reorientation and breakage of the thickener network take place, resulting in a progressive drop in the grease's rheological properties. After this, the aging is dominated by the breakage of smaller fiber fragments and the grease degrades at a much slower rate.

11 Progress in Rolling Bearing Technology for Refrigerant Compressors (December 2017)

Various surface treatment and bearing technology solutions are explored to solve challenging lubrication regimes.

12 Guide to Proper Bearing Lubricating Practices (October 2017)

Understanding proper bearing lubrication procedures is critical to ensuring long-term, trouble-free performance. Klüber Lubrication has prepared this explanation as a general guide.

13 Coupling Connection (August 2017)

Couplings and harsh environment use

14 Bearing Lubricant Solution (December 2016)

A Chicago-area bakery was replacing the tray support bearings in its ovens on a reactionary basis. Their weekly inspection cycle was resulting in two mechanics spending an average of 20 labor hours per week to replace failed bearings. The premature bearing failures were caused by a combination of the high heat and humidity in the ovens, resulting in lubrication failure and contamination. When BDI was asked to recommend a solution, the bakery was averaging one month of bearing life in this application.

15 Product News (March 2017)

The complete Product News section from the March 2017 issue of Power Transmission Engineering.

16 The True Cost of Bearing Lubrication (June 2015)

Machine and equipment manufacturers today are feeling more pressure than ever to reduce costs without sacrificing machine performance — a balancing act difficult to achieve. OEMs often overlook a simple solution that can have a positive, long-term impact on profitability for themselves and their customers, i.e. — the elimination of bearing lubricant.

17 Product News (April 2015)

Latest Products

18 A Need for Reduced Energy Costs (August 2010)

Options abound for increased efficiency in lubrication.

19 Often Overlooked, Lubricants Can Help Lower Energy Consumption (December 2011)

It is a simple fact: better lubrication can lead to dramatic energy savings and an improved bottom line. This ought to interest any plant manager who is looking for ways to reduce operating costs, and it is especially significant at a time when stricter government regulations are in direct contradiction to reducing costs. Lubrication reliability is the solution; this article will describe how manufacturing plants can use “lubrication reliability best-practices” to reduce their energy consumption, emissions and operating costs—all at the same time.

20 Improving Equipment Uptime - Composite Seals Meet the Challenge (October 2009)

In an industrial application, equipment uptime is vital for on-time performance and profitability. The rotating members of industrial machines are subject to the highest degree of wear and are more susceptible to failure than non-moving parts. Bearing surfaces are the most critical and often the most expensive portion of the rotary assembly; it is imperative to protect these components. The primary protector of these components is the industrial seal.

21 Bearing Lubrication Under Extreme Conditions, Part II (February 2008)

Rolling element or sleeve bearings often are required to operate under extreme conditions. In these instances, it is more important than ever to follow proper lubrication selection and maintenance procedures to maximize effective life and efficient performance.

22 Old Tricks for New Dogs (June 2008)

The latest developments for wind turbines from Voith Wind rely on proven technologies.

23 Trends in Industrial Gear Oils (April 2013)

With today's smaller, hotter - and overloaded - machinery, specifying the correct lubricant is vital.

24 Applying Open Gear Lubricants (February 2012)

When selecting an open gear lubricant for use in a particular application, the method of application used must be considered.

25 When a Good Gear Drive System Goes Bad (October 2012)

Even when the critical components of industrial power transmission gear drive systems are properly designed, specified and manufactured consistent with application requirements, performance problems can develop over time and failure may follow.

26 Product News (March 2014)

The complete Product News section from the March 2014 issue of Power Transmission Engineering.

27 Gear Lubrication: Long-Term Protection for Wind Turbines (April 2014)

The chemical and physical properties of gear oils may change, depending - more or less - upon their formulation and the environmental conditions under which they are used. This is why - after three years of use in a wind turbine - a gear oil was examined to determine if indeed changes were evident and if the protection of the gears and rolling bearings still met the same requirements as would be expected of fresh oil. Our findings revealed that the existing gear oil - as well as its ability to protect the gears and rolling bearings - had degraded very little compared to fresh oil.

28 Study of Multiple-Point Oil-Jet Lubrication of High-Speed Ball Bearings (June 2014)

The air-oil, two-phase flow inside the multiple-point, oil-jet lubrication ball bearing was studied based on CFD (computational fluid dynamics) theory and technique, and compared with single-point, oil-jet lubrication. The results indicate that the air-oil distribution inside the bearing with multiple-point, oil-jet lubrication is more uniform than single-point injection.

29 Lubrication and Seals Product Showcase (June 2014)

The following news items offer the latest on lubrication and seal technology in the power transmission market. From bearing greases to high-performance seals, these products will help extend the service life and manufacturing capabilities for a wide range of industrial sectors.

30 Grease Lubrication Mechanisms in Rolling Bearing Systems (October 2013)

Grease lubrication has clear advantages over oil lubrication: Grease does not leak easily; it has sealing properties; and it protects bearing surfaces from corrosion. Its disadvantages are grease-life limitations and a limited cooling ability. Moreover, in some applications there is a risk of grease starvation, which leads to reduced lubricating films. However, if the right grease, sealing system and/or lubrication system are chosen, then grease lubrication offers clear benefits. This article summarizes aspects of grease lubrication mechanisms in rolling bearings.

31 Load Capacity and Efficiency of Grease-Lubricated Worm Gears (September 2014)

Varying installation requirements for worm gears, as, for example, when used in modular gear systems, can necessitate grease lubrication - especially when adequate sealing for oil lubrication would be too complex. Such worm gears are being increasingly used in outside applications such as solar power plants and slew drives. While knowledge about the operating conditions is often appropriate, the basic understanding for load capacity and efficiency under grease lubrication is quite poor. Investigations done at FZG and sponsored by FVA/AiF are shown here to give an impression of the basic factors of load capacity and efficiency. The results of the investigation indicate a satisfying quality of calculations on heat, load capacity and efficiency based on characteristic parameters of the base oil with only slight modifications to the methodology known from DIN 3996 or ISO TR 14521.