calculating

Articles About calculating


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1 Calculating Inner Race Diameter (December 2012)

In this Ask the Expert article, Hans Wendeberg from SKF discusses some of the things you need to know when calculating bearing diameters.

2 Homogeneous Geometry Calculation of Arbitrary Tooth Shapes: Mathematical Approach and Practical Applications (February 2016)

This paper provides a mathematical framework and its implementation for calculating the tooth geometry of arbitrary gear types, based on the basic law of gear kinematics. The rack or gear geometry can be generated in two different ways: by calculating the conjugate geometry and the line of contact of a gear to the given geometric shape of a known geometry (e.g., a cutting hob), or by prescribing the surface of action of two gears in contact and calculating the correspondent flank shapes.

3 Not All Thin-Section Bearings Are Created Equal (February 2011)

American Bearing Manufacturers Association (ABMA) Standard 9 and ISO 281 give equations for calculating the basic dynamic radial load rating for ball bearings. These equations are based on a number of assumptions, many of which are not valid for thin-section bearings. (Thin-section bearings are described in ABMA standard 26.2.) Nevertheless, many thin-section bearing catalogs report load ratings based on these equations. Kaydon has developed a new method for calculating the dynamic radial load rating for thin-section ball bearings. The new method uses the contact stress and the number of stress-cycles-per-revolution to calculate the capacity. The new numbers are based on five years of actual test results. These equations can also be used to calculate the dynamic radial load rating for four-point contact ball bearings, which are not covered in ABMA standard 9 or ISO 281.

4 Calculating Pressure Concentration Factors (August 2008)

Using FEM to develop better keyless locking devices.

5 Reducing Electricity Cost through Use of Premium Efficiency Motors (February 2010)

motors with premium efficiency counterparts presents businesses with a significant opportunity to reduce operating costs. A comparison between premium and standard efficiency motors from 0.25 to 10 horsepower is conducted; comparisons of full-load efficiencies are shown, and estimated payback periods are calculated. Methods for calculating the yearly kilowatt-hour consumption and yearly cost savings of premium efficiency motors for this horsepower range are also given. The cost advantages of premium efficiency motors are summarized, and relevant examples of real world cost savings are shown.

News Items About calculating

1 KISSsoft VDI 2736 Receives New Supplement for Calculating Plastic Crossed Helical Gear Deformation and Wear (August 17, 2016)
The application area of plastic gears has grown significantly in the last decade. The requirements from the industry to design stronger, ...