Gear Repair

Articles About Gear Repair


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1 Motor Management Best Practices Part 3 (February 2016)

This three-part series on motor management best practices focuses on the importance of instituting a motor management plan as a necessity in effectively administering the electric motors in a facility. The goal of a motor management plan is to take advantage of opportunities for energy savings and increased productivity using energy efficient, reliable motors such as NEMA Premium efficiency motors, herein referred to as “premium efficiency” motors.

2 Copper in Motor Repair Facilities (March 2017)

Three electric motor repair facilities share best practices for utilizing copper in motor repair, and recommending new motors to replace older, less-efficient motors

3 The Hidden Cost of Incomplete Hydrodynamic Bearing Maintenance (April 2017)

Reliability and maintenance engineers can improve uptime and save money on both long-term maintenance and downtime costs by properly diagnosing and correcting bearing vibration issues when they exceed their acceptable limits. This requires inspecting the housing as well as the liner for wear, and replacing them as a pair when the housing is worn, so that wear-in between the mating surfaces can occur.

4 Motor Management - Best Practices (December 2015)

Energy costs and downtime can be greatly reduced by instituting a motor management plan. Part II of this three-part series specifically addresses the establishment of a motor failure policy and the development of purchasing specifications. Part I addressed the general aspects of a motor management plan, including the first steps of creating a motor inventory and guidelines for motor repair and replacement. Part III will examine motor repair specifications as well as preventive and predictive maintenance.

5 Motor Management - Best Practices (October 2015)

Reducing losses and increasing profits by instituting a motor management plan is what this series of articles is all about. Here in Part I, we discuss how to create a motor inventory and establish repair-or-replace motor guidelines. Subsequent topics in this three-part series will address (Part II) motor failure policies and purchasing specifications, and (Part III) repair specifications and preventive and predictive maintenance, respectively.

6 Bearing Repair Provides Valuable Alternative To Bearing Replacement for Heavy Industries (August 2008)

When a bearing is damaged, it is often removed from service and replaced before it reaches its full, useful and economical life. Advancements in bearing design, materials, bearing maintenance and repair methods have greatly improved the potential for and popularity of bearing repair as an effective way to extend the life of the bearing.

7 Best Practices for Gearbox Assembly and Disassembly (March 2014)

In most applications, gearbox reliability is critical to the productivity of the overall plant operation. So it follows that when industry is looking at the best ways to increase efficiency, reduce downtime, and increase profitability, gearbox performance and reliability are key factors. Designing for repair, and writing effective repair procedures, can speed the service time, and provide a quality refurbishment. The best practices listed in this article are proven, effective methods used to install and remove bearings, seals, gears, couplings and shafts within a gearbox.

8 Electric Motors: When is it Best to Repair, and When is it Best to Replace (June 2008)

The repair-versus-replace decision is quite complicated, depending upon variables such as rewind cost, severity of the failure, replacement motor purchase price and other factors.